Home > 2009 Fall BTO130 > BTO130 Lab 4 (due Dec 1)

BTO130 Lab 4 (due Dec 1)

November 27, 2009 Leave a comment Go to comments

BTO130 Lab 4
Due on Tuesday December 1 at the beginning of class

 

BTO130 Lab 4 (operating system memory and processes)

Assigned on Tuesday November 24
Due on Tuesday December 1 at the beginning of class
Grade value is 3% of your final course grade

Record your answers in a Microsoft Word document

 

Objectives

This lab has the following objectives:

  • To familiarize you with architecture components in an operating system
  • Get experience with Performance Console (and tools like this)

Do your own work. Follow the College’s Academic Honesty policy.

 

Getting started

Use your Vista virtual machine to do the Lab 4 tasks, and use your own computer to create the Microsoft Word document. (Why? Microsoft Word is not installed on your virtual machine.)

Follow these instructions:

  • You must use administrator-equivalent credentials (login or elevate) to have full functionality from the tools
  • On your own computer, create a new Word document called "bto130lab4"; this document will hold your typed answers and screen captures
  • Your document must be neat and organized
  • Use titles and narrative where appropriate
  • Make sure you label the beginning of your answer so that both of us know what question you are answering
  • For screen captures, capture ONLY the part of the screen that has the information you need (see the "Vista Snipping Tool" section below)
  • Before you send the document to your professor by email, reduce the document’s size by compressing the pictures (see the "Compress Pictures in Microsoft Word" section below)
  • The subject line of your email message to your professor must be "BTO130 Lab 4"

 


 

Vista Snipping Tool

Starting in Windows Vista, you can use Snipping Tool to capture a screen shot of any object on your screen. It offers you the following snipping options:

  • Window snip – captures the selected window by clicking on it
  • Rectangular snip – captures a rectangle by clicking-and-dragging
  • Free-form snip – captures an irregular shape by clicking-and-dragging
  • Full-screen snip

Your strategy will be to use the Snipping Tool to capture and save screen shots of your work, and after you have saved all of them, you will use email to send them to yourself.

To start Snipping Tool, click/press Start, type "snipping", and start the tool. (Obviously, you will do this in your virtual machine.) The program starts:

Snip1

 

We suggest that you change one option now. Click Options, and uncheck (clear) the bottom checkbox titled "Show selection ink…".

Snip2

 

When you’re ready to capture a screen shot, click the "New" menu, and choose one of the options. We suggest "Window snip" for Lab 4.

Now, hover your mouse over the window that you want to capture. It is outlined in red. Click it once, and it will be saved; the Snipping Tool editing program will open.

image 

 

To save your screen shot, choose File > Save As, and save it as a PNG type.

image 

 

Work to be done for Lab 4

Name any three (3) graphical tools that let you check the status of memory:

(type your answer in your Word document)

 

Name any three (3) graphical tools that let you check the status of processes and threads:

(type your answer in your Word document)

 

In this part of the exercise, you will configure a set of Performance Monitor counters to watch memory usage.

Performance MonitorStart a new Performance Monitor graph with no counters.

Add these counters:

  • Memory – available bytes
  • Memory – cache bytes
  • Memory – committed bytes

(As you add each counter, make sure you learn about it by reading the "Show description" information.)

Configure the scale of the graph and each counter, so that their tracing lines appear on the visible graph surface. See the example above; click it to see a full-size view.

While the graph is running and collecting data, start two or three memory-intensive programs (and document their names), use them for a few seconds, and then quit/exit them.

Save a screen capture of your Performance Monitor graph that shows the effect that this activity has on memory. Include this screen capture in your Lab 4 document.

 

In this part of the exercise, you will configure a set of Performance Monitor counters to watch processes and threads information.

Start a new Performance Monitor graph with no counters.

Add these counters:

  • Process – thread count
  • Process – % privileged time
  • Process – % user time

(As above, learn about the counters as you add them.)

Configure the scaling so that the tracing lines appear on the visible graph surface.

While the graph is running, start two or three compute-intensive programs (and document their names), use them for a few seconds, and then quit/exit them.

Save a screen capture of your Performance monitor graph that shows the effect that this activity has on processes and threads. Include it in your Lab 4 document.

 

Bonus worth extra marks

For bonus marks, you can attempt these exercises:

 

Sysinternals Process Viewer (1 mark)

Download the Sysinternals "Process Viewer" program. For best results, start it with administrator credentials. Add the Threads and Virtual Size columns.

Locate and describe something about at least one hierarchical process tree (that has at least three levels). What does the hierarchy mean; what processes are in that hierarchy, and so on. Include a print screen capture that shows the hierarchy.

The Process Explorer display highlights some processes with different colors. Describe the meaning of two colors that you see in your display, what they mean, and how you learned about them.

 

Macintosh OS X – find the similar functionality (1 mark)

On a Macintosh (which is running Mac OS X), locate and open the graphical tool which shows us information similar to what you find in parts of Task Manager, Performance Monitor, and Process Explorer.

Describe something about that tool. Then, include two print screen captures: 1) System Memory list, sorted by Virtual Memory, highest to lowest; and 2) CPU list, sorted by % CPU, highest to lowest.

Include one more print screen capture: Select the tool on the list, then click the "Inspect" icon on the toolbar, and click Statistics. Capture that screen.

 

IBM System i – find the similar functionality (1 mark)

On the IBM System i (using the credentials you were given earlier in the semester), locate and run the program that shows us information similar to what you find on the Processes tab of Task Manager. Obviously, the program runs in text/character mode.

Describe something about that tool. We’re interested in whether it updates the screen automatically, or whether the user has to update the screen. How do you sort the display from highest to lowest usage (we cannot just click the column header with the mouse!)? Then, include a print screen capture that shows the program’s data.

 

Linux – find the similar functionality (1 mark)

On a Linux installation, locate and run a program that shows us information similar to what you find in parts of Task Manager, Performance Monitor, and Process Explorer.

Describe something about that tool. Then, include a print screen capture of the tool, showing useful information.

 

Completing this lab exercise

From your virtual machine, send yourself the screen captures by email. Then, integrate them into your Word document.

To ensure that the document is as small as possible, make sure you "Compress Pictures", as described below.

Send your finished Word document to your professor by email.

______________________________________________________________

 

Compress Pictures in Microsoft Word

When you create a Microsoft Office document that includes pictures, the document’s size can be large. Use this "compress pictures" technique to reduce the document’s size. These instructions cover Word 2007, but other Office applications, like PowerPoint, work in a similar way.

Create and edit your document normally

Create and edit your document’s contents normally. Insert or paste graphics as required. Resize or crop as necessary. Save your work as you edit.

Before you send by email, compress pictures

After you have finished editing your document, and before you send it to someone by email, reduce the document’s size by using this "compress pictures" technique:

Save As
In the dialog’s lower-right area, click Tools
Then, select Compress Pictures

 

Select the Options button

 

Complete the dialog as shown below
Select the resolution which matches your intended destination

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Categories: 2009 Fall BTO130
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